3D objects from 1880 at the summer party of the university Jena

augmented reality sculpture industria

Were there already 3D objects in 1880? No, not really. But of course there were already three-dimensional objects;) For example the 26 cm high terracotta figure "Industria", which was created around 1880 and is stored in Ilmenau. The artist Émile Louis Picault was known for his allegorical sculptures, which gave a body to concepts like "industry". We are known for giving rare objects a second life as 3D objects. So we could take the historical art object in the form of a life-size augmented reality projection with us to this year's summer festival.

Why a 3D object from the "Industria"?

What is the embodiment of industrialization doing at the FSU Jena summer party? Why not a 3D sunflower or a 3D disco ball? Quite simply: We joined forces with the project "cultur3D" for digital culture and collection management in 3D. The innovation project has set itself the task of translating three-dimensional cultural assets, such as art objects or found objects, into virtual 3D models that are available from any location. The "Industria" is just such a 3D object. At the summer festival, visitors could view the life-size sculpture and even have a souvenir photo taken with it. With this we wanted to show the potential not only of the project cultur3D, but also the use of Augmented Reality 3D objects in general.

Advantages of 3D objects:

  • Cultural assets and rare objects can be made accessible to a broad mass
  • Presentations are not only possible in specially secured museum rooms
  • A 3D object can be viewed in many places by many people at the same time
  • 3D objects can be larger or smaller than their original, so large buildings can be viewed on the
    coffee table or small life-size sculptures can be admired
  • The objects can also be integrated into websites via our 3d Product Viewer


What else was there to see at the university summer festival?

Our 3D sculpture could not only be viewed in AR but also in VR. We also had some exhibits from the optical museum in our pocket, which could be viewed by visitors. And because there was still room in the bag, we also had the entire optical museum in VR with us. Guests only had to slip into their VR glasses for a short time and could stroll comfortably through the optical museum directly in the cafeteria.

We had a lot of fun and are already looking forward to the next event!